You Have Won The Lottery!!!! – Another Chase Bank Online Email Scam

Unfortunately, Another Chase Bank Email Scam

chasebamk.gif.1I received an email in my spam folder informing me of the good fortune that has befallen me. It seems I am one of 10 lucky winners of  the “Annual Year Lotto Lottery, conducted by: America Co-operation Management in Conjunction with United Nation Worldwide. To the tune of $50,000,000. Let me show you what this Chase email scam entailed.

First: A screenshot of the actual email

======================================================================

chasebank5

======================================================================

Basically…..

I received an email from this man from the highlighted email address: ( Red Flag!! )

chasebank4

They tell me it is important that I send them all of this personal information: Red Flag !! )

chasebank.PNG.1

To this email address: ( Red Flag !! )

chasebank2

In order for them to set up a bank account at JPMorgam Chase Bank in my name. After which I will receive a direct wire transfer in the amount of my winnings ( $50,000,00 ). TAH DAH!!! I am now free to withdraw my “Prize Money” Isn’t that great!!??? 

Four Of The   Red Flags

Of course I am reasonably certain this is a scam. I say this because first of all it is in my spam folder. There are three other indicators giving me pause to want to investigate.

#2 Return email address   What does Netflix have to do with Chase bank, or “Annual Year Lotto Lottery, conducted by: America Co-operation Management in Conjunction with United Nation Worldwide.”

#3 Asking for personal Information ( Self explanatory )

#4 Email address has a suspicious domain name. @mail.ru. I researched this email domain. It was an address registered to a Russian email provider. Why would someone claiming to represent an America Co-operation Management, with Chase bank be from Russia? Or any other country for that matter.

Spine Tingling

This is the Address of the Chase Bank I was supposed to do business with. So I Googled that sucker and to my astonishment, the location was just over one mile from my residence. I blocked out the county city state and zip code (For obvious privacy related issues.)

===================================================

 email lottery.png.1

===================================================

I thought to myself “Damn!! That hit pretty close to home”. It was kind of creepy.So I decided to call them and ask if they knew anything about this email. Using the contact info from this website I called and received a “no longer in service” recording.

chaseNext I dialed 411 to get the 411 on this banking institution. There was no Chase Bank listed in this town for the address given in the email. Yet it showed up with a website on the net. Upon further perusal of the website, way down at the bottom was another phone number. Attached to the name Karina Ramos.

Turns out her and her phone number were just about the only non-fictitious elements of info  on the page. Karina Ramos does indeed exist here. But where exactly is “here”. I can tell you that.

“Here” is the Chase bank I was trying to get a hold of but not only was the contact phone # a fake, the address was also incorrect. This particular Chase Bank happened to be located waaayyyy on the other side of town from me.

I did, however, speak to a very  politely pleasant young man. and he answered all my questions. I told him about the email I recently received and asked him if they had a location at the address I was provided with. He informed me there was no such location and calmly stated that Chase was in no way shape or form attached to it. I explained how I owned and operated a website that revealed scams for what they were to warn the public against such things. I could hear the smile in his voice when he replied that it was a good thing I was doing.

He then further stated that Chase would never ever ask their clients for personal information over the phone or through an email. All business like that was conducted face to face. No exceptions. Then he said he hoped more people would take the time as I did to just pick up the phone before allowing themselves to be lured into a malicious scheme thereby avoiding the situation entirely.

I thanked the young man for his time and hung up the phone. It is amazing the information that can be acquired for a simple five-minute phone call. I would rather be safe than sorry.

The Purpose Of This Scam

Other “winning the lottery emails” I have received usually include a link of some sort in order to lure you further into their web of lies and deceit. After you click it they try to get your personal info and then somehow try to part you from your $$$. If you return to the screenshot of the email I received, you will notice that there isn’t an actual link to click on that will take you anywhere.the-thinker-489753_1280

So then the question presented is why? What could they possibly get out of this if they are not asking for any kind of money? Well, let’s think about this for a moment shall we?

In the highlighted area, they state the need for your very personal information to enable them to set up a bank account in your name. Really??? Do they seriously think an adult(such as myself)incapable of setting up a bank account if I truly desired to do so? Kind of insulting don’t you think?

My Personal Conclusion

Given the facts as I have laid them out for you, I believe this is a clandestine attempt at identity theft. If someone is naive enough to actually part with their personal info, nuch less a scan of their personal identification, think about the damage that can be inflicted. identitytheft

A bank account in your name that whoever is sending these messages has control of can set you up for charges of fraud, theft, conspiracy, and money laundering. With your identification they would control that bank account and in all probability be able to gain access to any other financial arrangements you might have which could, in the long run cause serious financial ruin and probably land you in jail at the same time. Whew! That was a mouthful.

So Ladies and Gents, may this be a lesson; Always research these things that come to you before committing any private info and/or money to any kind of unsolicited email that finds it’s way to your inbox.

banner3

If you are truly interested in generating some extra income or perhaps forging a new destiny for yourself  why not learn more about affiliate marketing? 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *